todd williamsFour Missing Elements in your Project Managers

Todd C. Williams

Projects don’t need process. They require project managers who are partners in achieving the organization’s goals. PMs need to negotiate reasonable alternatives, sell innovative ideas, and motivate teams. They must be leaders who can transform the customer’s wants to needs. Otherwise, executives will be plagued with underperforming and failing projects.

 

Todd C. Williams 

For twenty-five years Presidents, V and C-Level executives worldwide have asked Mr. Todd C. Williams to help them rescue problem projects, build leading-edge systems, and improve organizational efficiency.  By using a simple four-step process for recovering projects his organization helps clients turn-around projects, prevent recurring failures, and streamline their organizations.  Mr. Williams is the author of Rescue the Problem Project: A Complete Guide to Identifying, Preventing, and Recovering from Project Failure, published by (AMACOM Books), as well as the Back From Red blog  http://ecaminc.com/index.php/blog that has been quoted on CIO Update, ZDNet, IT Business Edge, Center for CIO Leadership, and others.  His client base is diverse including BEA Systems, Bonneville Power Administration, Daimler Trucks NA (formerly Freightliner),  Hewlett Packard (formerly Digital Equipment Corp.) NASA, many professional organizations have called on him to educate their members such as, PMI, American Management Association (AMA), American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS), Financial Executives Networking Group (FENG), Institute of Management Accounts (IMA), American Society of Quality (ASQ), Society for Information Management (SIM).

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jack tollefsonThe "Secret" Reason IT Projects Fail at a Rate of 75%
and are likely to continue so...

Jack Tollefson

Everyone knows that IT projects struggle to succeed much more than other kinds. We often laugh off that failure rate saying “Well, there are people involved. What else could you expect?” Silently hoping such claims transfer our accountability for project success to them as their responsibility for failure When a project goes well we might say “Finally I had the right people,” proving our point all along: it is the others that are the problem. Many organizations have invested heavily in training project managers; using proven PM practices, and many PM positions now require PM certifications or qualifications. The hope is that increased rigor will limit failures. Yet the failure rate remains unchanged.

In this short, energetic presentation, Mr. Tollefson explores the assumptions of that thinking, how our own confidence in our tools and practices, if not complemented with… may actually contribute to the problem, and how we as project managers might be the real problem. Why? Because project success is our responsibility. Even when doing everything right; many things can still go wrong. As ambassadors of our profession we should probably admit that we have all seriously missed something significant here. Jack presents a new conceptual model to start the discussion around the missing “secret”.

Jack Tollefson

Jack Tollefson, founder of TeamStronger, has had a diverse career that has included extensive work in research, analysis, marketing, product development, software development, training and adult learning curriculum development, project management, and corporate administration. He holds a BA in Philosophy with an emphasis on knowledge theory, decision and game theory, and logic. He has founded three training and publishing companies, including what is now appdev.com. His clients include most Fortune 500 companies, thousands of mid to small sized companies, and several federal, state, and local government agencies, including California, Oregon, Utah, Idaho, Alaska, and Washington.

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PDU Category A, Component ID C331 (1 PDU)   pdf How to Register PDU's (538 KB)